Posts Tagged ‘Guinea Pig Cage’


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When we think of cages for guinea pigs, most of us tend to think of that tiny little rodent cage that is sold by most pet stores. Sure, guinea pigs are most certainly rodents — and yet, the standard pet store rodent cage is far too small to house an adult guinea pig.

Yes, most rodents are very small animals. But the fact is that size is not the prominent factor that defines a rodent.

If you look up the definition of a rodent, you will find that a) it is a mammal and b) they have continuously growing upper and lower incisors. This latter fact means that they have to continuously chew on things to keep their front teeth from growing out of control. In fact, the word rodent comes from the Latin word rodere which means “to gnaw”.

So a rodent is mostly defined by its front teeth — not by its size. A beaver is a rodent. You would never think of putting a beaver in a small pet store guinea pig cage. A porcupine is a rodent. Again, you would never put a porcupine in one of those tiny guinea pig cages. A capybara is a rodent that can grow to more than four-feet long. You could never put a capybara in a cage so small.

Guinea pigs can grow as large as three pounds or more. A small pet store rodent cage is simply too small to house a guinea pig. As I have said many times before — putting your guinea pig in a small pet store cage is like a human being living their entire life in a bathroom.

So why do so many people put guinea pigs in such small cages? Because that is what is sold to us.

Most guinea pig rescue organizations recommend that cages for guinea pigs be at least the following size:

  • One guinea pig: 6-7 sq. ft.
  • Two guinea pigs: 7.5 sq. ft.
  • Three guinea pigs: 10.5 sq. ft.
  • Four guinea pigs: 13 sq. ft.

So next time you shop for cages for guinea pigs remember that your pet is much larger than a hamster or a gerbil and therefore — his home should be too.

Looking for a spacious-yet-affordable home for your guinea pig? Check out the innovative C&C guinea pig cages that BlueStoneCommerce has to offer. Why not CLICK ON THE BUTTON directly below to visit one of our stores and check out our many distinctive designs…



Most other Cubes and Coroplast guinea pig cage sellers use plastic press-on connectors in their cage construction. This video will show you exactly why we here at BlueStoneCommerce disagree with this practice and exclusively use zip ties (tie-wraps, cable-ties) as fasteners in all of our cage designs.




C&C cages are becoming increasingly popular. Their usage has increased dramatically over the past few years. This is largely because pet owners are beginning to realize that while standard mass-produced pet store cages may be economically feasible to house racks of laboratory guinea pig test subjects, they fail to provide a comfortable and healthy living environment for our much-loved family pets.

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One of the most important factors in insuring that your guinea pig cage is easy to clean is ironically also one of the most overlooked criteria in cage selection. If you want to be assured that the next cage you purchase will be easy to clean and maintain, be sure to read on.

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Dec 29

The guinea pig is one of the most popular pets in North America. In spite of this, there are many facts about this little creature that are not commonly known by most people. Please join me as I attempt to explore (sometimes successfully) some facts regarding the history and characteristics of our friend the guinea pig.

Author’s note: No pigs were harmed in the writing of this article.

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Guinea pigs and humans share a history of more than 10,000 years. The cavy originated in Central and South America. In the wild, their domain extended through Uruguay, Argentina, Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru. The cavy was domesticated by the Inca Indians somewhere around 7,000 or 8,000 years ago. They were used as not only a food source but also as a sacrificial animal – sacrificed to the sun god – in religious ceremonies.

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The guinea pig – also known as a cavy – is one of the more popular pets in North America. This is largely because they are friendly, docile and amiable creatures. And with few special needs, they are also relatively easy to care for. There are many varieties of guinea pigs varying in color, size, markings and hair type.

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When you go shopping for a guinea pig cage, what are the things you consider? Color? Price? An attractive design? People choose their cages based upon many different criteria. However, there is one extremely important factor that often gets overlooked or ignored.

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Your choice of cage is one of the most important considerations in determining the quality of life that your guinea pig will enjoy while living under your care. One must keep in mind that the cage is much more than just a container or enclosure to contain the cavy; it is the most major and important element in your pig’s immediate living environment. As such, the selection of a cage for your cavy is a serious matter and should be not be taken lightly.

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Over the past century, the guinea pig has become a popular pet in the United States. While we are all familiar with this common animal, there are many facts concerning it that are not necessarily common knowledge. Please read along as we discover and discuss some interesting facts about this common and loveable house pet.

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Guinea pigs – we’re all familiar with this small rodent. We know what they look like and what they’re used for. They’re cute little rodents and they are pets. As far as most of us in the western world are concerned, that’s the complete story. But there is much more to the tale of the guinea pig’s history and its contribution to human society across the globe.

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With a hamster, you can just toss a wheel in its cage and it’ll hop right on it and chug away – going nowhere – and he’ll be perfectly happy. It reminds me of the people you see at the health club – chugging away on their elliptical trainers – going nowhere – but getting healthier. Toss a wheel into your guinea pig’s cage and see what happens. Chances are she’ll chew on it – that is until she gets bored and ignores it.

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In today’s short article, we are going to talk about bottoms. No – I don’t want to discuss your bottom – or even your guinea pig’s bottom. I want to talk about the need for incorporating a bottom when designing and building your C&C cage.

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As a guinea pig owner, you no doubt have a keen interest in learning about their origins, habits, behaviors and characteristics.

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Unlike rabbits, guinea pigs are not quiet animals. Guinea pigs make a lot of noise – especially in groups – and are in constant communication with each other and with their owners. As a guinea pig owner, you may be interested in the meaning of some of these sounds.

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You’ve brought home your new guinea pig(s), chosen a suitable and roomy cage – now, where do you put it? A) Garage, B) Closet C) In front of a window D) None of the above. The correct answer is D) none of the above. Among other requirements, cavies must be kept in a room with a stable temperature – free of drafts and out of direct sunlight. Finding a suitable location for your guinea pigs’ cage is a task that requires careful thought and diligence. When placing your pigs’ new home within your home, several factors should be considered.

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If children are older and reasonably responsible, they can (and should) take on a role in the care of your family’s guinea pig. With the words: Okay, we’ll get a guinea pig – but you will have to take care of it, many parents are tempted to completely abdicate their pig care responsibilities and assign them all to the child. This is almost never a good idea. While caring for any living creature is a great learning opportunity (and the parent may even tell the child that they are totally in charge of the animal’s health, safety and welfare); ultimately, the final accountability should always remain with the responsible adult.

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Guinea pigs are intensely social creatures. In the wild they used to live in groups called herds. If you are planning on getting a guinea pig, you must realize that, in addition to obtaining a new family member, you are also making a binding social commitment. As descendents of herd animals, guinea pigs do not do well in solitary situations. As such, you must be prepared to set aside significant time each and every day as a guinea pig owner to interact with your pet – an easy and enjoyable task for animal lovers. If you are more of a hands-off admirer of animals – or if your busy schedule prohibits rich daily interaction with your cavy, then it is highly recommended that you get a second or third pig to satisfy your pet’s social requirements.

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The cute and cuddly little guinea pig has anything but a cute and cuddly scientific name – Caviidae porcellus. The domestic guinea pig is a rodent and, among others, his relatives are the beaver, the mouse and the porcupine. Just where did this cute, cuddly little rodent come from? If you answered “the pet store”, you missed the meaning of my question completely.

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You and your guinea pig may have more in common than you realize. Both you and your guinea pig must have vitamin C to survive. Unlike other mammals who manufacture vitamin C from glucose in the body, you and your guinea pig both lack a particular enzyme needed to perform this process. Thus, both human and guinea pig vitamin C requirements must be satisfied by external sources.

Your guinea pig must have a regular source of vitamin C or it will perish. Vitamin C is a water-soluble substance. Fat-soluble vitamins (like vitamins A, D, E and K) are dissolved by lipids – fat globules. Once these vitamins are absorbed by lipids, they are stored in your body’s tissues.  Vitamin C, on the other hand, is not stored in the body. It is dissolved by water and any excess vitamin C in your guinea pig’s body will be excreted in the urine. Because vitamin C passes so quickly through your cavy’s body, they must be given supplements on a daily basis.

A great way to supplement your pig’s diet with the C vitamin is to feed them a diet rich in dark leafy vegetables such as parsley, kale or romaine lettuce. Be sure to avoid iceberg lettuce as it is mostly water and empty calories. It is essentially devoid of any nutritional value. As a general rule of thumb – the darker and richer the color of a fruit or vegetable – the more vitamins it contains.

To insure that your pig is getting sufficient amounts of daily vitamin C, it is also recommended that you supplement its diet with vitamin C supplements in the form of tablets or liquid drops. Tablets can be crushed and sprinkled on food or dissolved in drinking water. Liquid supplements can be added to drinking water or sprinkled on your guinea pig’s food.

Be careful when adding vitamin C to your pig’s drinking water. Vitamin C can be destroyed by substances found in tap water in certain regions. Your safest bet is to use distilled or purified water.

Your cavy needs vitamin C to survive. While supplementation is recommended, it should not be the only source of vitamin C for your guinea pig. Your pig’s diet should also contain plenty of dark green vegetables. Since vitamin C is water-soluble, there is little danger of giving too much vitamin C to your cavy. All excess vitamin C will be safely eliminated from the body in the urine.



Just how much do you know about the guinea pig? Take this short test of cavy knowledge to find out.

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This video will show you how to help AVOID SERIOUS INJURY to your guinea pigs. Most people do not consider this factor when buying or building their C&C cages. See why not having a cage bottom may spell serious disaster to your pigs (and possibly your carpet) in certain common situations.



Guinea pigs are wonderful pets with great dispositions. They require little maintenance and make terrific pets for older children. But guinea pigs are not for everyone. Here are just a few factors to think about before running down to your favorite animal shelter or pet store to pick one up.

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A guinea pig is just a rodent – a tiny insignificant animal. Sure, the kids like them. But just the same, when you bring them home from the pet store, they’re just like any other possession (except they have that annoying habit of moving around) so they must be contained. So we have to toss them in a cage and give them food and water every day. They’ll be fine.

Hopefully that’s not your attitude.

Too many people seem to forget that guinea pigs are actually living, breathing beings that need to be cared for and shown the same respect that every living creature deserves. Not all people with this attitude are cold-hearted, unfeeling villains. Most are probably just well-meaning pet owners who simply haven’t done the research in order to educate themselves well enough to become knowledgeable, competent pet-owners.

As Guinea Pig C&C cage designers and sellers, we come into contact with a lot of guinea pig owners (often brand new guinea pig pet owners). We also communicate with and are monitored by various guinea pig rescue organizations. As such, there is one common specific cage-related situation which keeps surfacing and which is also decidedly hazardous to your pigs’ health and safety. The purpose of this article is to alert you to this common hazard so that you can easily avoid it.

This common problem is the usage of cage floors and other cage walking surfaces made of metal bars or grids. Many commercial cages are built with wire floors. The purpose of the wire floor is to let feces and other solid materials fall though the openings into a litter pan below. To clean, one simply slides out the litter pan and empties the pan. Very convenient – but dangerous for your pigs. While these types of cages offer a distinct convenience advantage for the owner, they are hazardous for your pig’s foot health.

Your guinea pig’s footpads are delicate and sensitive structures. To your pig, walking on wire mesh is just like you spending your entire day walking on rebar or similar metal bars in bare feet.

Living in a cage with a wire floor can cause sores and ulcers on your pig’s footpads. Additionally, your pig’s feet can get wedged or trapped between the metal bars.  Pigs housed in cages with wire floors often suffer broken toes and legs.

The same is also true of ramps in multi-level cages. Ramps should not contain metal bars, mesh or anything else that may trap or irritate your guinea pigs tender feet.

Be sure to purchase or build a cage with a smooth bottom to avoid the injuries detailed above. Also, if applicable, make sure the ramp has a non-slip surface to allow your pig to negotiate it without falling or slipping but avoid ramps with metal bars or wire grids as these can trap delicate guinea pig feet and toes and cause painful injuries.



So you’ve just brought your new guinea pig home from the shelter or pet store. And now, you’re not entirely sure what to do. Let us help you get off to a good start with this Quick-Start Guinea Pig Owners’ Guide.

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Is your guinea pig or rabbit chewing your C&C cage – or are you concerned that they might? See how to make your C&C guinea pig or rabbit cage chew-resistant in this informative DIY (Do-it-yourself) video.



Guinea pigs make great pets. They are generally friendly and good-natured – although some may tend to be on the shy side. Like any other animal, guinea pigs have a natural language for communication. As a curious guinea pig owner, being able to understand some of the more common “messages” from your little pets will make your experience with your pigs more meaningful, memorable and enjoyable.

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Coroplast is not cardboard nor is it plastic-coated cardboard. It is an extruded twin-wall polypropylene plastic sheet product. In other words, it’s 100% plastic. This material was originally chosen years ago for guinea pig cage application by a guinea pig rescue organization as a way of economically constructing large living quarters for rescued pigs. It is lightweight and durable and, if not abused, will last for years in your guinea pig cage. View the video to learn all about Coroplast and see a dramatic demonstration of it’s strength.



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When we think of a guinea pig, we usually picture the American Guinea Pig – the “classic” or “standard” guinea pig – and also the most common. But there are also several other breeds in addition to the common American Guinea Pig. This article will introduce you to a few of the breeds commonly found in homes today.

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Unfortunately, many people don’t pay close attention to ramps when searching for cages. But ramps are an important element of multi-level guinea pig and rabbit cages. 

If you want the peace of mind that comes from the knowledge of knowing that your pigs are safe, you will shop around until you find a ramp that is both 1) strong enough to safely support your pig and 2) has No Metal Grids or Bars – these can injure your pigs’ feet and legs. 

Learn all about the materials used in the construction of various types of guinea pig and rabbit cage ramps. See demonstrations of various ramp designs under heavy loads.



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  • Perfect Slim-Profile guinea pig cage for kids room. Great gift for the holidays! Be a HERO NOW! http://tinyurl.com/yefp5uq at Bonanzle. #

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True or false: Guinea pigs are small, hybrid animals that have been cultivated and cross-bred from wild pigs originally captured on the island of New Guinea. The fact that this animal was originally cross-bred in the laboratory to establish a pig breed that was both of friendly disposition and small enough to keep as a house pet, is the reason that the guinea pig still remains associated with labs in most of our minds today.

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This video shows you one of our very unique cages. It’s a slim profile cage – we call this model the Large Mega-Tower. This cage does for the guinea pig cage what flat screen monitors did for TV. It fits closer to the wall and saves space. If you’re a little short on room – perhaps you live in an apartment or dorm room, or maybe it’s going in a kid’s room where there’s not a lot of space – this cage may help solve your problems.

This video was made to appear in our eBay listing for this product. The introductory part of the video is common to all our cage videos. Footage specific to this cage begins at about the 4:12 minute mark. You can see a couple of our guinea pigs in it. Charlie is the one in the pet store cage and Pumpkin makes her cameo appearance – being chased around the Colonial. And if you like the cage, be sure to visit any of our online stores to get more information on it. Just click on any of the store links on the Home Page of this web site. 

Enjoy the video:



What is a C&C Cage?

First of all, I mention the phrase C&C cage in the title of this article. This is cage-building technology that has become more and more popular in recent years. C&C stands for Cubes and Coroplast – the two major components used to design and construct these types of cages.

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Check out our 2nd infomercial. See why guinea pig cages need to be stronger than you think. Discover why wheels may be a more important option than you thought. See Cosmo – the 15 lb wonder pig. This video shows you our biggest cage ever – the Deluxe Colonial Homestead with Storage being tested under heavy loads.
If you’re interested this deluxe, new 3-level 2×4 guinea pig custom large cage, or another C&C design, visit our eBay store or our web site because… your pigs are waiting.



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Guinea pigs are lovable little creatures. They make great pets, are relatively easy to care for and can be very friendly if they are brought up with care and kindness. One very important step in bringing a new guinea pig into the home is providing adequate housing.

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Check out our very first infomercial – made to appear in our eBay listing for this cage. This video shows you our biggest cage ever – the Deluxe Colonial Homestead with Storage. Not only is this cage HUGE, but it has four storage bays in the bottom level to store guinea pig supplies. The introductory part of the video is common to all our cage videos. Footage specific to this cage begins at about the 4:12 minute mark. Also, see a couple of our guinea pigs. Charlie is the one in the pet store cage and Pumpkin makes her cameo appearance – being chased around the Colonial. If you’re interested a deluxe, new 3-level 2×4 guinea pig custom large cage, visit our store at http://stores.ebay.com/BluestoneCommerce-Cages-and-Guitars or visit our web site at http://www.BlueStoneCages.com because… your pigs are waiting.