The cages that pet stores try to pass off as healthy and suitable guinea pig habitats are generally neither healthy nor suitable. Those small pet store cages are usually designed to meet the old two to four square-foot guinea pig cage design standards. These standards are not there to satisfy your guinea pigs’ needs. They are there to satisfy the financial needs of the cage manufacturer and the pet store.

It’s a simple fact. Smaller guinea pig habitats are cheaper to ship and warehouse than larger cages. Do the analysis yourself.

Let’s assume for a moment that you’re a manufacturer of paper. If you wish to ship 10 reams of paper, you will simply pack them into a box and ship them. If you now decide to ship 100 reams of paper, you will need a box ten-times as large — that is, it will require ten-times as much volume as the smaller box. Shipping costs will rise accordingly. But, you will have shipped ten-times as much product and will expect to make a lot more profit on the transaction.

If, on the other hand, you are a cage manufacturer and you wish to ship a cage; you will once again package it in a box and ship it. Now, if you wish to ship a cage ten-times as large, you will once again need to pack it into a box with ten-times as much volume. Again, shipping costs will go up because the package is much bigger. But this time you, the cage manufacturer, are not shipping ten-times the amount of product. Mostly you are shipping ten-times the amount of air. The amount of actual material that you will be able to charge your customer for has not increased nearly as much as the volume of the product. In effect, you a paying a lot more money to ship air (empty space) — air that the final customer will not be willing to pay for.

This scenario is repeated again in your warehouse. A cage that is ten-times as large requires significantly more space to warehouse. And, once again, that means more costs — more money spent to warehouse additional air.

And the story is repeated a final time at the pet store or department store where the final sale is made. Larger guinea pig habitats will require more back room storage space in addition to increased front-of-store retail shelf-space.

Thus, it costs disproportionately more money to transport, store and display a larger manufactured cage because of the large amount of air or empty space that must be shipped.

On the other hand, if a cage can be shipped as a kit, shipping costs can be reduced. An example of this is the C&C cage. Since these cages can be shipped flat in a disassembled state, the problem of “shipping air” can be minimized. This is just one reason why C&C cages allow you to get a lot of cage for the money.

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Read more about large guinea pig cages HERE–> Guinea Pig Cages – Room to Roam

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