(This article on Coroplast usage in cavy cages is continued from a previous post)

Coroplast resembles cardboard because of its fluted structure. If you look at a piece from the end, you will notice that structurally, it is made up of a long row of plastic columns.  The fact that Coroplast looks like cardboard is a good thing. Cardboard is a substance that we take for granted — but, in fact is a very efficient and innovative material.

For example, we can throw a few heavy cans of food in a paper bag. And when we try to pick it up, the cans rip through the bag and fall to the floor. We can then take many more of those same cans and toss them into a cardboard box which can be picked up with no problem. We can even ship them across country without incident.

Sure the box is thicker — but that is not where most of the additional strength comes from. It is really the internal structure of the cardboard that gives it its strength. Those columns or corrugations in the interior of the cardboard create a very strong and robust structure.

If you stand up that same paper bag and try and stack something on top of it, the sides will immediately crumble and the bag will collapse. Conversely, you can take several cardboard boxes and stack them on top of each other with no problem — just take a look inside any warehouse. Once again, it’s because all those little columns inside the cardboard are supporting all that weight.

Engineers and architects have known this for centuries. The early Romans used columns in their architecture to support heavy buildings. Take a look at the Coliseum. Aeronautical engineers use a honeycomb material (which is simply a lot of columns pressed together) inside the interior of airplane wings to provide a very strong and lightweight structure.

This is the very same concept behind the structure of Coroplast. It is what makes it very light — yet very strong. It’s as if there were a lot of columns pressed together in a row. And that is what makes Coroplast such a desirable material for use in C&C cavy cages.

Its fluted structure gives it adequate strength. Its chemical properties makes it waterproof, easy to clean and non-toxic for your cavies. And finally, its light weight reduces shipping costs when purchasing from an online seller like BlueStoneCommerce.

Be sure to read Part One of this post regarding the C&C Cavy Cage and Coroplast

For information on understanding a different aspect of C&C guinea pig cages <– CLICK HERE 

BlueStoneCommerce uses Coroplast in all of its cage models.
Why not CLICK ON THE BUTTON directly below to visit one of our stores and check out our innovative cavy cages

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Categories: Guinea Pig Cages


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