Archive for the ‘Pig Stories’ Category


BlueStoneCommerce – Scooter’s Misadventures

Scooter (the guinea pig in the guitar case) was our friendliest pig and loved to be petted all of the time. If you remember we thought he was a she when we first brought him home but soon discovered otherwise. We have a wonderful vet that is very skilled and knowledgeable about exotic pets, which guinea pigs are considered to be exotic. Therefore, we had Scooter neutered so Pepper, our shy and nervous female and he could live together in wedded bliss. About 7 months later we noticed a large bump underneath him, near to the area that had been neutered.

Read More…



BlueStoneCommerce – Life Moves On

Scooter, our friendly neutered male pig and Pepper, our nervous female pig settled into life in their Penthouse cage. Scooter was always showing Pepper how manly he was by doing his rumble strut. Pepper mostly ignored him unless she was in the mood. Sound familiar?!

Read More…



BluestoneCommerce’s First Penthouse Pig Pen

Scooter and Pepper now needed a larger cage than the cramped pet store cage that Pookie had lived in. We went online and found a wonderful guinea pig rescue organization called Cavy Spirit. On their website they included instructions on how to put together a C & C cage. The mysterious name C&C originates from the two main materials used to construct this category of small animal cage: Cubes and Coroplast.The frame and wire lattice portion of the cage is built from wire grids normally used in the assembly of wire grid storage cubes. The grids are usually 14”x 14” coated metal grids with nine 1½ inch spaces between the bars. The second C in C&C comes from the other fundamental material used in C&C cage construction — Coroplast. Coroplast is a trade name and is essentially a contraction of the product description: corrugated plastic. Coroplast is corrugated polypropylene plastic sheeting and is used to form the litter pan or bin in the bottom of the cage.C&C cages are almost always built as do-it-yourself projects and tend to be very much larger (and therefore healthier for your pig) than standard manufactured “pet store cages”.

Read More…



After Pookie passed away my daughter wanted 2 guinea pigs to take Pookie’s place. I read that they love company and are lonely when housed singly. So, I agreed that we would adopt two pigs to share our home this time.

I knew that we didn’t want to adopt a male and a female for obvious reasons. It was time to study the book to learn how to identify the males from the females. The book tells you that it was easy to tell the difference between the two sexes…

Read More…


Oct 10

Our very first guinea pig that we shared our home with was named Pookie.

My daughter had a mouse named Peek-a-Boo that a boy at school had given her but she was not a very friendly mouse. She was looking for another pet that wouldn’t bite her every time she tried to touch it. I found out that guinea pigs are cuddly, mild-mannered and are not likely to bite. When my daughter asked for a guinea pig, not being very responsible about cleaning Peek-a-Boo’s cage, we told her if she would clean the mouse’s cage for a month and showed us how responsible she was, then we would go looking for a guinea pig to share our home with. Well, she faithfully cleaned the cage for a month and that is how we came to adopt Pookie into our home.

Read More…